InterStim® Therapy for Fecal/Urinary Incontinence

If you suffer from seemingly untreatable urinary or fecal incontinence – it may be time to try neuromodulation with InterStim® for incontinence. When medications can’t help, the InterStim® System may be able to.

Bladder Control Therapy

InterStim® is a medical device system created by Medtronic to deliver Sacral Neuromodulation – an effective and long-term treatment for bladder control. Sacral neuromodulation is a procedure in which electrical stimulation is applied to help treat the miscommunication between the brain and the bladder. InterStim® is an FDA approved system for delivering Sacral neuromodulation – talk to Dr. Meenakshi Jain today if you want help controlling your leaky bladder!

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How Do I Know if InterStim® is for Me?

If other methods of trying to control bladder problems haven’t worked for you, you may want to talk to your gynecologist about InterStim® therapy. There will be an initial trial period to see if neuromodulation will be an effective way to treat your urinary incontinence. If the trial period goes well, there will be a long term treatment plan utilizing the InterStim® system. You can learn more about how the InterStim system works here. The procedure is minimally invasive.

Can InterStim Therapy Work in Younger Patients?

The risks of InterStim Bladder Control Therapy are minimal. Talk to us about the procedure and the potential to live without leaks. Call (727) 343-2568 today.

“Interstim neuromodulation therapy is a very cutting edge treatment. It is a treatment that is out-patient, minimally invasive, no general anesthesia, no intubation, no abdominal surgery. It basically is a pacemaker and this pacemaker looks like a little silver coin that’s the battery. And the lead goes in the tailbone. It’s done under local anesthesia. You put this little battery in the woman’s butt cheek. Nobody knows you have it, the woman is not a bionic woman, no wires are coming out of them, nobody knows. And the best thing which I like about this is, before you implant the pacemaker in the patient you can do a trial. So you are sending the patient with a temporary pacemaker for about 4-5 days. If their urinary and bowel episodes have improved dramatically, if there is an improvement of 50-60%, only those patients are candidates for a permanent Interstim implant. The implant is permanent and the battery has to be changes every 4-5 years, done under local anesthesia and sedation. So even older patients, I have 85 year old women who are very young 85. Why should they have to live with incontinence, there is no reason.”